gillianlasomnambule

itsvondell:

laurakvstheworld:

yepperoni:

i think about the 3d printed spider robot dancing to salsa a lot and im not sure if it’s because of the music or if it’s because of the hypnotizing dance moves
most likely both 

this is the best thing ive ever seen in my whole life

oh my god…. i was feeling down and this absolutely 100% lifted me out of it. oh my god!!!! i love him!!!!!

this is bizarre.

nataliemeansnice
curvily:

How often have you been shopping and you come across something that is just PERFECT, but does not go up to your size? Over 60% of American women wear a size 14 or above, but only 17% of clothing sold is 14 & up. That is a ridiculous disparity.
Moreover, when some brands move into plus (ahem H&M), they throw their signature trendy looks by the wayside in favor of flowy dark fabrics that they think “work” for plus sizes. That is crap. Plus size women want color, print, and structure. Moreover, we want variety. A group this numerous cannot be a monolith, and since style is such a personal thing, we all have different tastes. I want #plussizeplease to be a way to showcase the demand for styles we’d buy and rock, and all the money brands are forfeiting by refusing to expand their sizes.
So here’s how to use it:
1) Snap a picture of a garment you love but does not come in your size. Include the brand and price, tagging the company if possible. For example, I am in love with this Zara marble print dress. I would have purchased it yesterday if it went above a size L. My tweet would be:
“.@Zara marble print sheath, $59. I’d buy it right now if it came in my size. #plussizeplease”
2) Use it on any social media – Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest… even Facebook supports hashtags now.
3) Tag anything you’d purchase, whether in store or online.
4) Feel free to include the size range it comes in and/or the size you think you’d need. Sizing can be tricky, so this is definitely not required.
5) Tell your friends! I don’t just want this to be a blogger thing – I want all women who wear size 14 and up to show their purchasing power and share styles they love. Let’s be unignorable!

curvily:

How often have you been shopping and you come across something that is just PERFECT, but does not go up to your size? Over 60% of American women wear a size 14 or above, but only 17% of clothing sold is 14 & up. That is a ridiculous disparity.

Moreover, when some brands move into plus (ahem H&M), they throw their signature trendy looks by the wayside in favor of flowy dark fabrics that they think “work” for plus sizes. That is crap. Plus size women want color, print, and structure. Moreover, we want variety. A group this numerous cannot be a monolith, and since style is such a personal thing, we all have different tastes. I want #plussizeplease to be a way to showcase the demand for styles we’d buy and rock, and all the money brands are forfeiting by refusing to expand their sizes.

So here’s how to use it:

1) Snap a picture of a garment you love but does not come in your size. Include the brand and price, tagging the company if possible. For example, I am in love with this Zara marble print dress. I would have purchased it yesterday if it went above a size L. My tweet would be:

“.@Zara marble print sheath, $59. I’d buy it right now if it came in my size. #plussizeplease”

2) Use it on any social media – Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest… even Facebook supports hashtags now.

3) Tag anything you’d purchase, whether in store or online.

4) Feel free to include the size range it comes in and/or the size you think you’d need. Sizing can be tricky, so this is definitely not required.

5) Tell your friends! I don’t just want this to be a blogger thing – I want all women who wear size 14 and up to show their purchasing power and share styles they love. Let’s be unignorable!

thatzak

thatzak:

honestly I’d rather be an extravert than introvert 

there are too many social and life benefits to extraversion and the aspects of introversion that tumblr likes to romanticize aren’t that great to begin with

neither is better than the other but I have to work at taking on extraverted qualities so I can accomplish the things I want to accomplish in life

thatzak

thatzak:

John Green books were very important to me when I started reading them in high school and I still hold on to Paper Towns as one of my favorite books of all time. By the time The Fault In Our Stars came out I was past the point of being in the mindset to relate to John’s writing. I still enjoyed it but it didn’t grab me like his other books did at the time. If the book came out when I was 17/18 I guarantee I would have liked it a lot more.

The reason I’m not a fan of the “it’s a metaphor” part of the book is because I found it to be not much more pretentious than how the characters in his books usually act and behave. This also waters (no pun intended) down the character trait for me that Augustus is supposed to be pretentious. So when the bar for pretentiousness is already a bit up there, going above it was a bit grating for me as a reader. With that being said it’s pretty inconsequential in the long run and doesn’t at all ruin the book.

I find the “it’s a metaphor” jokes to be really funny because it’s like Mad Libs where you can switch out the words with something vulgar and it’s funny. I’ll admit that it hits the juvenile portion of my sense of humor. With the set up and pay off being exactly the same each time I am surprised the jokes still make me laugh and I get a weird satisfaction from things that I find enjoyable yet are mostly the same every time (like an episode of House or Pawn Stars). And like I said earlier, I do like the book. I’m not someone who only makes fun of things I dislike. I make fun of things I do like just as much as things I don’t like in my day-to-day life.

I only speak for myself here and this is just my personal point of view.

kayleyhyde
Sometimes you’re 23 and standing in the kitchen of your house making breakfast and brewing coffee and listening to music that for some reason is really getting to your heart. You’re just standing there thinking about going to work and picking up your dry cleaning. And also more exciting things like books you’re reading and trips you plan on taking and relationships that are springing into existence. Or fading from your memory, which is far less exciting. And suddenly you just don’t feel at home in your skin or in your house and you just want home but “Mom’s” probably wouldn’t feel like home anymore either. There used to be the comfort of a number in your phone and ears that listened everyday and arms that were never for anyone else, but just to calm you down when you started feeling trapped in a five-minute period where nostalgia is too much and thoughts of this person you are feel foreign. When you realize that you’ll never be this young again but this is the first time you’ve ever been this old. When you can’t remember how you got from sixteen to here and all the same feel like sixteen is just as much of a stranger to you now. The song is over. The coffee’s done. You’re going to breathe in and out. You’re going to be fine in about five minutes.
The Winter of the Air